Roadworthiness Reform

This consultation has concluded.

The Victorian Government is seeking community feedback on options to reform Victoria’s roadworthiness system to reduce overall costs for the community. Have your say via the quick survey and discussion forum.

Currently, the cost of the system outweighs the cost of vehicle defect related crashes to the community. The reform is only focussed on the requirement for vehicle transfers and excludes buses and taxis.

An optimised system would:

  • better target areas of high defect related risk
  • match the extent of the actual road safety problem
  • provide a balance between road safety risks and costs
  • be directed to the key areas of the vehicle that cause crashes (e.g. tyres, brakes and steering).

Economic analysis, road crash statistics and comparisons with other states and countries have been used to develop three proposals based on shorter, cheaper tests and concentrating testing on older, out of warranty vehicles. Please read the consultation paper which presents the three proposed options and provides necessary information and data for you to make an informed contribution in the discussion forum.

The Victorian Government is seeking community feedback on options to reform Victoria’s roadworthiness system to reduce overall costs for the community. Have your say via the quick survey and discussion forum.

Currently, the cost of the system outweighs the cost of vehicle defect related crashes to the community. The reform is only focussed on the requirement for vehicle transfers and excludes buses and taxis.

An optimised system would:

  • better target areas of high defect related risk
  • match the extent of the actual road safety problem
  • provide a balance between road safety risks and costs
  • be directed to the key areas of the vehicle that cause crashes (e.g. tyres, brakes and steering).

Economic analysis, road crash statistics and comparisons with other states and countries have been used to develop three proposals based on shorter, cheaper tests and concentrating testing on older, out of warranty vehicles. Please read the consultation paper which presents the three proposed options and provides necessary information and data for you to make an informed contribution in the discussion forum.

Forum

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • 30

    What is a reasonable test fee?

    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Currently overall test costs for a light passenger vehicle are around $150. A shorter test may reduce this to around $100.


    Currently overall test costs for a light passenger vehicle are around $150. A shorter test may reduce this to around $100.

    This forum is for community discussion about the topic and is moderated to provide a safe space to raise and debate issues. VicRoads observes but does not intervene in the conversation.

    Currently overall test costs for a light passenger vehicle are around $150. A shorter test may reduce this to around $100.


    Currently overall test costs for a light passenger vehicle are around $150. A shorter test may reduce this to around $100.

    This forum is for community discussion about the topic and is moderated to provide a safe space to raise and debate issues. VicRoads observes but does not intervene in the conversation.

    by VicRoads 12 Apr 2013, 05:05 AM 2238 views
  • 43

    Which parts of the roadworthy test could be removed to reduce the test time without substantially impacting the safety of vehicles?

    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Currently the Victorian roadworthiness test covers a broad range of inspection areas on the vehicle including:

    • Wheels and tyres
    • Steering and suspension
    • Brakes
    • Seats and seat belts
    • Lamps, signals and reflectors
    • Exhaust and emission control
    • Windscreen and windows
    • Windscreen wipers and washers
    • Body and chassis
    • Engine and driveline

    Currently the Victorian roadworthiness test covers a broad range of inspection areas on the vehicle including:

    • Wheels and tyres
    • Steering and suspension
    • Brakes
    • Seats and seat belts
    • Lamps, signals and reflectors
    • Exhaust and....Read more

    Currently the Victorian roadworthiness test covers a broad range of inspection areas on the vehicle including:

    • Wheels and tyres
    • Steering and suspension
    • Brakes
    • Seats and seat belts
    • Lamps, signals and reflectors
    • Exhaust and emission control
    • Windscreen and windows
    • Windscreen wipers and washers
    • Body and chassis
    • Engine and driveline

    Currently the Victorian roadworthiness test covers a broad range of inspection areas on the vehicle including:

    • Wheels and tyres
    • Steering and suspension
    • Brakes
    • Seats and seat belts
    • Lamps, signals and reflectors
    • Exhaust and emission control
    • Windscreen and windows
    • Windscreen wipers and washers
    • Body and chassis
    • Engine and driveline

    This forum is for community discussion about the topic and is moderated to provide a safe space to raise and debate issues. VicRoads observes but does not intervene in the conversation.

    by VicRoads 12 Apr 2013, 05:03 AM 1865 views
  • 21

    Is there any other evidence that demonstrates a link between the stringency of inspection schemes and road trauma?

    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Within Australia, a link between the stringency of inspection schemes and road trauma has not been well demonstrated. Unless substantial evidence is to emerge demonstrating the effectiveness of the Victorian roadworthiness system in preventing crashes, the proposal to reduce regulatory burden is valid.


    Within Australia, a link between the stringency of inspection schemes and road trauma has not been well demonstrated. Unless substantial evidence is to emerge demonstrating the effectiveness of the Victorian roadworthiness system in preventing crashes, the proposal to reduce regulatory burden is valid.

    This forum is for community discussion about the topic and is moderated to provide a....Read more

    Within Australia, a link between the stringency of inspection schemes and road trauma has not been well demonstrated. Unless substantial evidence is to emerge demonstrating the effectiveness of the Victorian roadworthiness system in preventing crashes, the proposal to reduce regulatory burden is valid.


    Within Australia, a link between the stringency of inspection schemes and road trauma has not been well demonstrated. Unless substantial evidence is to emerge demonstrating the effectiveness of the Victorian roadworthiness system in preventing crashes, the proposal to reduce regulatory burden is valid.

    This forum is for community discussion about the topic and is moderated to provide a safe space to raise and debate issues. VicRoads observes but does not participate in the conversation.

    by VicRoads 12 Apr 2013, 05:02 AM 692 views
  • 9

    Should roadworthy reform be applied to light and heavy vehicles equally?

    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    This reform excludes buses and taxis. Are there other categories of vehicles which should be excluded? Categories to be considered include motorcycle, light trailer, light passenger vehicle, light commercial vehicle, heavy vehicle and heavy trailer.


    This reform excludes buses and taxis. Are there other categories of vehicles which should be excluded? Categories to be considered include motorcycle, light trailer, light passenger vehicle, light commercial vehicle, heavy vehicle and heavy trailer.

    This forum is for community discussion about the topic and is moderated to provide a safe space to raise and debate issues. VicRoads observes but does not participate in the conversation.

    This reform excludes buses and taxis. Are there other categories of vehicles which should be excluded? Categories to be considered include motorcycle, light trailer, light passenger vehicle, light commercial vehicle, heavy vehicle and heavy trailer.


    This reform excludes buses and taxis. Are there other categories of vehicles which should be excluded? Categories to be considered include motorcycle, light trailer, light passenger vehicle, light commercial vehicle, heavy vehicle and heavy trailer.

    This forum is for community discussion about the topic and is moderated to provide a safe space to raise and debate issues. VicRoads observes but does not participate in the conversation.

    by VicRoads 12 Apr 2013, 05:01 AM 468 views
  • 67

    Does removing the requirement for roadworthy on newer vehicles (3 or 5 years) reflect the actual risks?

    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    Ideally, the roadworthiness test should be able to focus on the areas of the vehicle that are most likely to lead to a defect related crash. Newer vehicles are typically well serviced, protect their occupants better and demonstrate lesser rates of defects than older vehicles.


    Ideally, the roadworthiness test should be able to focus on the areas of the vehicle that are most likely to lead to a defect related crash. Newer vehicles are typically well serviced, protect their occupants better and demonstrate lesser rates of defects than older vehicles.

    This forum is for community discussion about the topic....Read more

    Ideally, the roadworthiness test should be able to focus on the areas of the vehicle that are most likely to lead to a defect related crash. Newer vehicles are typically well serviced, protect their occupants better and demonstrate lesser rates of defects than older vehicles.


    Ideally, the roadworthiness test should be able to focus on the areas of the vehicle that are most likely to lead to a defect related crash. Newer vehicles are typically well serviced, protect their occupants better and demonstrate lesser rates of defects than older vehicles.

    This forum is for community discussion about the topic and is moderated to provide a safe space to raise and debate issues. VicRoads observes but does not participate in the conversation.

    by VicRoads 12 Apr 2013, 04:59 AM 3586 views